Posts Tagged: john

Just Chilling

As you have probably noticed we have decided to start reworking the layout of the site.  We have already restructured the homepage to only display our posts and no external ones.  You can still view external posts in the Dive News section.  We will also be adding new photos and content under the resources tab that will include gear reviews and other useful information that our club uses before any dive.  While dogging through photos I found this one of a Sea Turtle on the YO-257 off of Hawaii.  I only did some minimal editing on this using Picasa and yes, it was shot on a Go Pro Hero 3+.

Happy Diving!

Sea Turtle on the YO-257!

The Benefits of a Shakedown Dive

The benefits of a shakedown dive are numerous. Before I partake in any sort of technical dive, a dive in a new environment, or a dive with a new dive buddy or piece of gear I go to a local site and do a shakedown dive.  This helps me to get comfortable and practice any skills that may be rusty.  Since I am a certified technical diver I always begin my dives by descending and performing a safety drill. This involves using my isolator manifold to shut one tank valve, breath the regulator to the last breath, switch to my alternate, pen the first valve that I shut, then close the other valve that I am breathing on until the last breath.  I then switch back and verify I can reach the isolator valve.  This training ensures that in the event of an emergency I know what an out of air situation will feel like and that I can act accordingly.  Once that is complete I either shoot a bag to practice or just enjoy the dive.  The below video is of two new dive buddies and I all doing a shakedown dive at Edmonds Underwater Park.  The sunset itself is worth it.

How do you perform shakedown dives?

Happy Diving!

Tech Dive 1: USS Spiegel Grove

This was a shakedown dive for some of DiveYeti’s technical divers.  Since we are all scattered across the country now we do not have a lot of time to dive together.  On this dive the plan was to descend to 115′ and attempt to locate the hatch to the engine room.  What actually happened was that we descended to 85′ and just dove around the superstructure getting reacquainted with each others diving styles.  Here is a video that cuts a 60 minute dive into 6 minutes.  I hope you enjoy it!

Happy diving from DiveYeti!